Quick potato curry

Any mixture of vegetables could be used in place of cabbage and broccoli here. If you want to add meat, it’s best to cook it through first, then remove it from the pan to make up the rest of the curry, adding the meat back in at the very end – this helps to avoid having under or overcooked meat. Vary the amount and strength of the curry powder to your personal taste.

Fry 1/2 onion, diced, and 2 cloves garlic, finely sliced, in a little oil until golden brown. Add 1 small potato, peeled and chopped into 1cm cubes, a handful of red cabbage, finely sliced, and a handful of purple sprouting broccoli, roughly chopped along the stem; fry over a medium heat until the broccoli leaves have wilted. Coat in 1/2 tsp coriander seed (ground or whole), 1/2 tsp cumin seed (ground or whole), 1 heaped tsp curry powder, then add 2 heaped tbsp gram (chickpea) flour and 2 heaped tbsp peanut butter. Fry for a few minutes, then slowly add approx. 1 cup of water, stirring into the mixture as you go, until the potato cubes are covered by liquid. Cook on a low heat for about 10 minutes, or until the potato is cooked through and the liquid has reduced to a thick sauce. Serves 1 alone or 2 with naan.

Chinese style fried cabbage

Adapted from an old book of Chinese recipes a friend found for me in a charity shop. Any kind of cabbage can be used; I’d recommend at least two types for the variety. Hard cabbage like white or red should be added with the onion; soft leaves such as savoy, Chinese leaves or pak choi should be added later. Like a lot of hot-and-fast cooking, this can get smoky, so open a window or turn on the extractor fan if you have one.

In a small bowl, mix together 1/2 tbsp brown sugar, 1 tbsp white wine vinegar, 1/2 tsp soy sauce and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Finely slice 1 onion, 1/2 small red cabbage and 1/2 small savoy cabbage. Heat a spoonful of oil in a non-stick pan over a high heat until a haze develops over the oil. Add the onion and red cabbage to the pan and fry, stirring continuously, until the onion becomes translucent. Add the savoy cabbage and fry for 2-3 minutes, again stirring continuously, until the savoy cabbage begins to brown. Stir in the sauce mixture, stir to coat, and take off the heat. Serve with rice and a protein component of your choice.

Serves 2 generously.

Sprat and Bulgar Wheat Cabbage Salad

I threw these ingredients together with surprisingly good results. Sprats are also known as whitebait; they’re one of the cheapest fish available in supermarkets although you can usually only get them at deli counters.

Remove the heads and tails of 100g (around eight) sprats, cut in half along one side of the spine and remove the spine by pinching it at one end and running your fingers down the length of the spine (this seems to be the quickest and most effective method). Boil 1/3 cup bulgar wheat in water with a pinch of salt for ten minutes, or until cooked through, then strain. Fry in a little oil a generous handful of red cabbage, shredded, one clove of garlic, finely sliced, and two mushrooms, sliced, until the cabbage is beginning to soften. Push to the side and lay the sprats skin-down in the pan and cook until the flesh turns opaque, then stir into the vegetable mixture with the bulgar wheat, the seeds from 1/3 pomegranate and 1/4 tsp each of coriander, turmeric and cocoa powder. Season with black pepper and serve.

Serves one.